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1994 A Push Dbq Essay

 

Document

B

Source: Josiah Strong.

Our Country: Its Possible Future and Its Present Crisis.

New York: American HomeMissionary Society, 1885.It seems to me that God, with infinite wisdom and skill, is training the Anglo-Saxon race for an hour sure to comein the world's future.

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The unoccupied arable lands of the earth are limited, and will soon be taken.

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Thenwill the world enter upon a new stage of its history

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heflnal competition of races, for which the Anglo-Saxon isbeing schooled,

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Then this race of unequalled energy, with all the majesty of numbers and the might of wealthbehind it

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he representative, let us hope, of the largest liberty, the purest Christianity, the highest civilization

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will spread itself over the earth. If I read not amiss, this powerful race will move down upon Mexico, down uponCentral and South America, out upon the islands of the sea, over upon Africa and beyond, And can any one doubtthat the result of this competition of races will be the "survival of the fittest"?

Document

C

Source: Alfred

T.

Mahan.

The Interest of America in Sea Power.

Boston: Little, Brown, 1897.Is the United States

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prepared to allow Germany to acquire the Dutch stronghold of Curacao, fronting theAtlantic outlet of both the proposed carials of Panama and Nicaragua? Is she prepared to acquiesce in any foreignpower purchasing from Haiti a naval station on the Windward Passage, through which pass our steamer routes tothe Isthmus? Would she acquiesce to a foreign protectorate over the Sandwich Islands [Hawaii] that great centralstation of the Pacific?Whether they will or no, Americans must now look outward. The growing production of the country demands it.An increasing volume of public sentiment demands it. The position of the United States, between the two OldWorlds and the two great oceans, makes the same claim, which will soon be strengthened by the creation of thenew link joining the Atlantic and Pacific. The tendency will be maintained and increased by the growth of theEuropean colonies in the Pacific, by the advancing civilization of Japan, and by the rapid peopling of our PacificStates.

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Three things are needful: First, protection of the chief harbors, by fortifications and coast-defense ships.

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Secondly, naval force, the arm of offensive power, which alone enables a country to extend its influence outward.Thirdly, no foreign state should henceforth acquire a coaling position within three thousand miles of SanFrancisco,

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Lawrendra 1 Anton Lawrendra Dr. Burns AP U.S. History, Period 1 11 February 2008 1994 DBQ 1. To what extent was late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century United States expansionism a continuation of past United States expansionism and to what extent was it a departure? United States expansionism has undergone many changes throughout the years. We have expanded for land, for God, and for the economy. As the people of the United States progressed both socially and economically, the methods of expansionism evolved from non-interference to democratic control, all the while struggling to stay true to the ideals of the forefathers. United States expansionism in the late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century was both a continuation and departure of past United States expansionism with regards to overseas annexation, social and economic dominance, and religious power over immigrants. The growth of the navy gained bargaining power for the U.S. With our big stick, we had the means to venture into noncontiguous lands, such as the Philippines and even China. We began expanding to find markets for our ever-growing production. Once we had conquered the continental United States we saw that we had the ambition to take on the world, as well as a faith in God that expanded manifest destiny across bodies of water into previously unobtainable lands. Document C underlines the importance of naval power, as well as outlining the three necessary